Leopold von Sacher-Masoch: Much More than Masochism

While today the term “masochism” is widely known, few know its origin, let alone anything about the man behind the name—Leopold von Sacher-Masoch. A while back I posted about this Lviv native’s childhood experiences in the Galician capital (found here), but now I’d like to share a few curious, lesser-known facts […]

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Przemyśl in Old Postcards

The small city of Przemyśl (Peremyshl in Ukrainian transliteration) now lies a few miles west of the Polish-Ukrainian border. Under the Austrian Empire, Przemyśl was one of the major Galician towns. Like nearby Lviv, the city’s population consisted of many nationalities, including Ukrainians, Poles, Jews, Germans, and Czechs. According to […]

Austrians in Galicia: Тhe Hirsch Family

One of the most interesting revelations for me in researching my family history has been discovering ancestors of different ethnic, religious, and linguistic backgrounds. Growing up in the Ukrainian diaspora, I had always assumed all of my ancestors were Greek Catholic Ukrainian-speakers, but the more I have learned about my family, […]

Life in the Galician Village of Bila: Sickness & Injury

A look at early twentieth-century life in Bila (Polish: Biała), a village bordering Ternopil in eastern Galicia. The description is from the autobiography of Katherine Rychly Pylitiuk, who was born in Bila in 1904, grew up there, and immigrated to the United States in 1922. This post is taken from […]

Lviv’s First Monument: Stanisław Jabłonowski’s Missing Shadow

By Chris Wilkinson At the intersection of Shevska and Teatralna Streets in Lviv’s Old Town is Stefana Yavorskoho Square. It does not strike a visitor as a particularly historic place. The square has a couple of cafes, eating establishments and a boutique store. Across the street is the St. Peter […]

Nineteenth-Century Galicia in the Lithographу of Karl Auer

Karl Auer (German: Karl Auer; Czech: Karel Auer; Polish: Karol Auer) (1818-1859) was a lithographer and graphic artist of Czech descent who worked in Lviv and Galicia for over 20 years. After graduating from the University of Vienna in the 1830s, Auer came to work in Lviv at the invitation […]

The Galician Railway

By Iwona Dakiniewicz The journey to America was long, costly, and tedious. The majority of emigrants came from remote villages. Peasants began their journey with teams of horses or on foot, to get to the nearest railroad station. This article gives you a possibility of locating the railroad station from which […]

Life in the Galician Village of Bila: Food

A look at early twentieth-century life in Bila (Polish: Biała), a village bordering Ternopil in eastern Galicia. The description is from the autobiography of Katherine Rychly Pylitiuk, who was born in Bila in 1904, grew up there, and immigrated to the United States in 1922. This post is taken from […]

The Galician Schematism: A Staff Yearbook

By Iwona Dakiniewicz It’s a stroke of luck for those researching Galician ancestors, the next potential source of genealogical information — and, to the delight of those interested, it can be browsed online. The Schematyzm Galicyjski [Galician Schematism] — a staff yearbook with personnel details of authorities, offices, societies, and institutions — was […]

1892 Galicia: Illustrated Polish-Language Guidebook

Presented below are photographs of eastern Galicia and its people from a Polish-language illustrated guidebook for the Austrian State Railways written by Adolf Inlender and published in Vienna in 1892. Adolf Władysław Inlender (Inlaender) (1854-1920) was a civic and political activist, journalist, and pharmacist in Galicia. Illustrated Guidebook for the Imperial-Royal […]

The Eastern Fair in Lviv: Pavilions

The Eastern Fair The Eastern Fair (Targi Wschodnie in Polish) was a major trade fair in interwar Poland. It was established in 1921 in Lviv, after the end of the Polish-Soviet War, which redrew the Polish-Soviet border and incorporated Galicia into the Second Polish Republic. The aim of the trade […]